Why are Climate models written in programming languages from 1950?

Why are Climate models written in programming languages from 1950?

Recently, a friend sent me a Wired article entitled “The Power and Paradox of Bad Software”. The short piece, written by Paul Ford, discusses the idea that the software industry might be too obsessed with creating better and better tools for itself while neglecting mundane software such as resource scheduling systems or online library catalogs. The author claims that the winners of the bad software lottery are the computational scientists that develop our climate models. Since climate change might be one of the biggest problems for the next generation, some might find it a bit worrying if one of our best tools for examining climate change was written with “bad software”.

In this post, I discuss the question of wether climate scientists lost the “bad software sweepstakes”. I’ll cover the basics of climate models, what software is commonly used in climate modeling and why, and what alternative software exists.

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Spacemacs: A Productive Combination of Emacs and Vim

Spacemacs: A Productive Combination of Emacs and Vim

In this tutorial, I will go over how to install and setup my favorite editor: Spacemacs. Spacemacs is a great editor that combines the best of Emacs and Vim. Spacemacs can be configured to be as heavyweight and featured as an IDE, a lightweight text editor, and everything in between. When I first discovered Spacemacs, I struggled to find resources on customization. This post explains why I use Spacemacs as well as provide installation instructions with my configuration on macOS Catalina.

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